who says it can't be real?

I am an acknowledgedly privileged white Wisconsin girl and former medical student at UW-Madison who now doesn't know what the freak she's doing with her life. A proud queer romantic asexual still working on being just as ecstatic about her biaural sensorineural hearing loss (almost there).

This sounds like a formal manifesto so let's change the beat. I AM A FREAKIN' GLITTERBABY FANGIRL. LOVE ME! (or get annoyed with me but I'll just pull a Dumbledore and whip my hair Aberforth).

I warn you there will be social justice butt kicking infused with borderline freakish amounts of Starkid, Harry Potter, Glee, The Hunger Games, all things theatre, Firefly, Doctor Who, Doctor Who, Doctor Who, and all sorts o' nerdy things all the other nerds geek about.

Reblogged from inkystars

mselizabethcomstock:

"margaery tyrell is straight!!!!! she married two different men!!!!"

image

(Source: lordprotectorattano)

"

What if it’s a phase?

What if it is? That doesn’t stop you being asexual right now.

It may be tempting to hold back on accepting your asexuality in the hope that eventually you’ll ‘bloom’ into a sexual person. I’m not saying that might not eventually happen, but consider this: do you want to spend your life thinking of yourself as an undeveloped person, living for the dreamed of day when you’ll become whole? Might you feel more comfortable accepting who you are now as a whole complete valid person? Maybe one day you will “bloom”, and if and when you do, you won’t have lost anything by being comfortable in the mean time.

There’s no shame in identifying as one thing and then later identifying as another. Your identity isn’t meant to limit you. If you’ve moved on or changed, then by all means describe yourself differently. If you fear you might be different in the future, that doesn’t change which label is most useful to you in the present. There’s nothing wrong with change.

"

Reblogged from barefootinadress

AVEN FAQ (via barefootinadress)

(Source: awesometastical101)

"Should Cap, as Vulture suggests, be more old-fashioned in his attitudes on gender, race or sexuality? I’m inclined to think not. For one, World War II saw massive social upheaval in both the first two categories, and we’ve already seen Cap work alongside a strong, authoritarian woman, so it seems weird that he’d suddenly have a problem with that. He’s also well established as both an underdog himself and a champion of same, so it would be strange for him to suddenly take a stance against tolerance. Rogers is not a man desperate to prove himself; he remains the same kid that he was underneath, trying to do what he feels is right rather than subscribing to some outside notion of machismo that demands he also be sexist or homophobic or something. And aside from any questions of decency and responsible filmmaking, from a storytelling point of view it would be endlessly distracting if Cap suddenly started making homophobic statements or patting passing women on the butt (he wasn’t exactly a ladykiller in the ’40s; why would he suddenly turn boorish now?).

What’s important and interesting about Cap is exactly what some people dismiss as boring. It’s that decency and honesty and sense of moral authority. In a film world full of compromised characters, flawed protagonists and out-and-out anti-heroes, Steve Rogers is a breath of fresh air. Someone with no secrets, who literally wears his high ideals as a uniform and gets on with the job at hand, is far more interesting than any number of self-torturing, whiny man-children."

Reblogged from callmekitto

Why Do People Think Captain America Is Boring? (via osointricate)

(Source: chujo-hime)

Reblogged from falsettofetish

livingindaydreams:

not-safe-for-earth:

do-tha-loki-motion:

221cbakerstreet:

rectumofglory:

isjustprogress:

BIRD FRIENDS

That middle picture is so sensual

#LOVE BIRDS

This fandom sings to me

(Source: gemini0526)

Reblogged from sandshoes-vs-granddad

(Source: what-fresh-hell-can-this-be)


A young Daniel Radcliffe with the books Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them and Quidditch through the Ages

Reblogged from sandshoes-vs-granddad

A young Daniel Radcliffe with the books Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them and Quidditch through the Ages

(Source: helenation)

Reblogged from falsettofetish

thatsabingo:

I kind of love the idea of Steve being bi. Like, when he was younger, he’d see a guy and think he was good looking, but he’d just stamp that down or chalk it up to being an artist and finding beauty in everything. Then he meets Peggy and he really likes her so he thinks of himself as “fixed”.

When he wakes up in our time he stumbles into learning about the different kinds of genders and sexual orientations and it just hits him like “Oh. I guess that explains it.” And after New York when things settle in to something like a routine and he actually has a chance to look around and Natasha starts on her mission to set him up, he starts to really accept and become okay with being attracted to men and women.

One day when they’re heading out on a mission, Natasha brings up another woman from SHIELD and Steve just goes “What about that guy who works in reception?” and he says it casually, but he’s really sort of nervous because she’s the first person he’s told. Natasha just pauses for a beat and looks at him before shaking her head “Kevin? No, he’s got a terrible hair cut. You can do better.” And after that she starts including guys in the people she suggests to him.

idk I just like that headcannon

Reblogged from falsettofetish

maadskittlez29:

Do you love the colors of Marvel?

YES. YES I DO.

(Source: tonystarkfucksaround)

catsfurever:

catsfurever:

i’m guessing these are the lesbians

i can’t believe this

Reblogged from teenagehuman

catsfurever:

catsfurever:

i’m guessing these are the lesbians

i can’t believe this

Reblogged from luna3141

retrogradeworks:

elizabethplaid:

incognitomoustache:

saintbucky:

Anthony Mackie being the first black superhero (and making Bill O’Reilly uncomfortable) on Jimmy Fallon (x)

I am so happy that Anthony Mackie is a person that exists.

For anyone who’s going: “But what about Storm/Hancock/Frozone/War Machine etc etc?”: they’re referring to the fact that the character Falcon was the first African-American superhero* created (debuted in Captain America #177 in 1969). If you’ve watched the clip, you’ll notice that Mackie corrects Jimmy Fallon when he says first black superhero. This is because the first black superhero was Black Panther - debuted in Fantastic Four #52 in 1966 - whom lives in the fictive African country Wakanda, and is thus not a citizen of the USA.

(* = the word “superhero” is usually not used for hero characters that pre-date Superman, nor actually very often used outside the mainstream comic book companies aka DC Comics and Marvel Comics. This is why such characters as The Phantom, created in 1936 aka 2 years before Superman, and whom wears spandex and a mask and punches evil guys in the face, is not generally dubbed a super hero. Anyway, the point of this asterisk is that I have no idea how many fictional, non-“super” hero characters there were of African decent before 1966)

Reblogging for uncomfortable O’Reilly and awesome comic book information.

This is absolutely magical.